↠´ Summer Sisters Î Download by ↠´ Judy Blume

↠´ Summer Sisters Î Download by ↠´ Judy Blume This story has so many elements that should make it an easy success.
The senitmentality of childhood summers, first love, finding and defining family, a ragstoriches tale, your first best friend, lost love, betrayal.
.
.
But it just failed so hard!

None of the characters were believable; all were flat caricatures.
The Saintly Martyred Poor Girl who worships Spoiled Socialite Girl, then lives with New York Jew and Southern Belle.
The fathers are Emasculated Pushover and Hippy Mellow.
Younger guys are Hunky Morons or Good Guy Who You Don't Know Exists or Sexcrazed Asshole.
Yuck.
I hated everyone, and while that can sometimes be a brilliant ploy by a writer to make a social or political statement (Fitzg I like that Vix and Caitlin were born the same years as me, it was easy to relate to that.
I didn't come from a rich family nor a struggling bluecollar family.
But I could understand the feeling of trying so hard but not quite fitting in.


And looking at the 2 of them and their families, you see that nurture versus nature struggle.
Vix, you didn't have the benefit of money becomes a responsible, caring adult.
Though he sister gets pregnant at 17.
Then we see Caitlin, who has every advantage but is selfish and irresponsible while her brother becomes a successful scientist.


But I still wonder how Vix could remain friends with Caitlin through the years.
Perhaps she was used to not expecting anything in I read this book every summer, mostly because it does such a great job of capturing the essence of the season.
(I actually prefer to read it when it's still a little cold outside so I can be transported to warmer weather, but for the past few years it's been so hard to find time to get it in!) Anyway, if you define a favorite book as one you want to read again and again, this is definitely one of my favorites.
I guess I'm not really surprisedAre You There, God? It's Me, Margaret had the same hold over me when I was younger.
I just love how fastpaced and frank Judy Blume's writing style isit's so different from what you get with most chick lit.
At times, it gets to be a little bit too much, but for the most part, I think it creates a more powerful story.
One thing I really enjoy doing is rereading kids books.
I checked out Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and zoomed through it in about two hours.
I have reread many other classics and enjoyed them.
I think my next big kids read will be the infamous Harriet the Spy which I loved and totally identified with as a child.


One of the greatest regrets of my life (in terms of small scale regrets, anyway) is that I sold off my Sweet Valley High books.
Now, granted, SVH isn't all that 'classic', but I so loved the storyline and always identified with Elizabeth.
I used to own every book up past a hundred, and all of the special editions (summer, winter, etc) they had out.
It took me years to collect.
Now I have about three of them at home.
I have been checking used bookstores but This story has so many elements that should make it an easy success.
The senitmentality of childhood summers, first love, finding and defining family, a ragstoriches tale, your first best friend, lost love, betrayal.
.
.
But it just failed so hard!

None of the characters were believable; all were flat caricatures.
The Saintly Martyred Poor Girl who worships Spoiled Socialite Girl, then lives with New York Jew and Southern Belle.
The fathers are Emasculated Pushover and Hippy Mellow.
Younger guys are Hunky Morons or Good Guy Who You Don't Know Exists or Sexcrazed Asshole.
Yuck.
I hated everyone, and while that can sometimes be a brilliant ploy by a writer to make a social or political statement (Fitzg I like that Vix and Caitlin were born the same years as me, it was easy to relate to that.
I didn't come from a rich family nor a struggling bluecollar family.
But I could understand the feeling of trying so hard but not quite fitting in.


And looking at the 2 of them and their families, you see that nurture versus nature struggle.
Vix, you didn't have the benefit of money becomes a responsible, caring adult.
Though he sister gets pregnant at 17.
Then we see Caitlin, who has every advantage but is selfish and irresponsible while her brother becomes a successful scientist.


But I still wonder how Vix could remain friends with Caitlin through the years.
Perhaps she was used to not expecting anything in I read this book every summer, mostly because it does such a great job of capturing the essence of the season.
(I actually prefer to read it when it's still a little cold outside so I can be transported to warmer weather, but for the past few years it's been so hard to find time to get it in!) Anyway, if you define a favorite book as one you want to read again and again, this is definitely one of my favorites.
I guess I'm not really surprisedAre You There, God? It's Me, Margaret had the same hold over me when I was younger.
I just love how fastpaced and frank Judy Blume's writing style isit's so different from what you get with most chick lit.
At times, it gets to be a little bit too much, but for the most part, I think it creates a more powerful story.
One thing I really enjoy doing is rereading kids books.
I checked out Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and zoomed through it in about two hours.
I have reread many other classics and enjoyed them.
I think my next big kids read will be the infamous Harriet the Spy which I loved and totally identified with as a child.


One of the greatest regrets of my life (in terms of small scale regrets, anyway) is that I sold off my Sweet Valley High books.
Now, granted, SVH isn't all that 'classic', but I so loved the storyline and always identified with Elizabeth.
I used to own every book up past a hundred, and all of the special editions (summer, winter, etc) they had out.
It took me years to collect.
Now I have about three of them at home.
I have been checking used bookstores but Starting with the things I liked, I appreciated the book for it's nostalgic factor and being a quick, light read.
It was seasonally appropriate and took me down memory lane in more ways than one.
.
.
reminiscing about how complicated teenage female relationships can be and how people who know you in your formative years probably see you differently than anyone else in your life.


However, overall I thought the book was uneven.
The first half of the book reads like an erotic teen novel.
I get that they are horny and experimenting, but their relationships are completely defined by sex.
The heartpounding and pulsating wore thin on me after like the sixth time.
And she could have referred to "The Powe I loved this book when I read it because it reminded me so much of the relationship I had with my best friend growing up.
We spent numerous summers together at her parents' cottage having the requisite summer flings with out of town boys who we would never see again (until the next summer), and this book made me very nostalgic for those times.


What I liked was how Judy Blume told the story not only from a generic narrator's perspective, but also from the perspective of each character in the story.
This made the book more interesting, and gave me ideas outside of my own for what each character was thinking in different situations.


I also liked how Ms.
Blume captured the friendship between Caitlin and Victoria Victoria being the calm, straightlaced friend, Caitlin being the quintessential wild child and the ups and downs and little "competitions" they In The Summer Of , Victoria Leonard's World Changed Forever—when Caitlin Somers Chose Her As A Friend Dazzling, Reckless Caitlin Welcomed Vix Into The Heart Of Her Sprawling, Eccentric Family, Opening Doors To A World Of Unimaginable Privilege, Sweeping Her Away To Vacations On Martha's Vineyard, A Magical, Windblown Island Where Two Friends Became Summer Sisters

Now, Years Later, Vix Is Working In New York City Caitlin Is Getting Married On The Vineyard And The Early Magic Of Their Long, Complicated Friendship Has Faded But Caitlin Has Begged Vix To Come To Her Wedding, To Be Her Maid Of Honor And Vix Knows That She Will Go—for The Friend Whose Casual Betrayals She Remembers All Too Well Because Vix Wants To Understand What Happened During That Last Shattering Summer And, After All These Years, She Needs To Know Why Her Best Friend—her Summer Sister—still Has The Power To Break Her Heart This is one of the unique books for which my opinion was so controversial.
Not with other reviews, but with mine.

The narrative was written as a light romance for summer, being at times irritating, especially the parts with firstperson narrative.
The book was unduly prolonged.
Judy Blume is at her best with her children's and coming of age stories.

At the same time, the story was captivatingly dark, relative, and personal.

I mentally rated the book 1, 2, 3, 4 stars, but not with the following sequence.
So, I will rate the average2,5 rounded up for the perfect ending.
Blume didn't have any other choice.

Not a book you read.
A book you devour.
Unsurprisingly, there are few reviews by men here.
But I think any male writing writing female characters (in this case female friendships) could benefit from reading Blume.


And, yes.
This is a great hot summer read, best read on a dock.
Like so many of the other reviewers, I was a huge Judy Blume fan growing up.
I really responded to her honest portrayals of teenaged girls and boys, and of the complex relationships they have with each other, their friends, and their parents.
So I picked up 'Summer Sisters' with a mixture of trepidation (I didn't want to 'ruin' my love affair with Ms.
Blume and all my memories of her past books) and excitement (what if she had managed to pull it off, and had written a book for all her 'grownup' fans?).


Well, as you can see from my 2star rating, my opinion is lukewarm at best.
I think that truthfully, if it were NOT Ms.
Blume who had written this book, I'd score it a bit higher.
But the sad fact is that I had expectations and they were not met.


Unlike some other reviewers, I was not bothered by the oral sex conversations (I mean, this IS ho



I loved this book when I read it because it reminded me so much of the relationship I had with my best friend growing up.
We spent numerous summers together at her parents' cottage having the requisite summer flings with out of town boys who we would never see again (until the next summer), and this book made me very nostalgic for those times.


What I liked was how Judy Blume told the story not only from a generic narrator's perspective, but also from the perspective of each character in the story.
This made the book more interesting, and gave me ideas outside of my own for what each character was thinking in different situations.


I also liked how Ms.
Blume captured the friendship between Caitlin and Victoria Victoria being the calm, straightlaced friend, Caitlin being the quintessential wild child and the ups and downs and little "competitions" they Starting with the things I liked, I appreciated the book for it's nostalgic factor and being a quick, light read.
It was seasonally appropriate and took me down memory lane in more ways than one.
.
.
reminiscing about how complicated teenage female relationships can be and how people who know you in your formative years probably see you differently than anyone else in your life.


However, overall I thought the book was uneven.
The first half of the book reads like an erotic teen novel.
I get that they are horny and experimenting, but their relationships are completely defined by sex.
The heartpounding and pulsating wore thin on me after like the sixth time.
And she could have referred to "The Powe This is one of the unique books for which my opinion was so controversial.
Not with other reviews, but with mine.

The narrative was written as a light romance for summer, being at times irritating, especially the parts with firstperson narrative.
The book was unduly prolonged.
Judy Blume is at her best with her children's and coming of age stories.

At the same time, the story was captivatingly dark, relative, and personal.

I mentally rated the book 1, 2, 3, 4 stars, but not with the following sequence.
So, I will rate the average2,5 rounded up for the perfect ending.
Blume didn't have any other choice.

Not a book you read.
A book you devour.
Unsurprisingly, there are few reviews by men here.
But I think any male writing writing female characters (in this case female friendships) could benefit from reading Blume.


And, yes.
This is a great hot summer read, best read on a dock.
Like so many of the other reviewers, I was a huge Judy Blume fan growing up.
I really responded to her honest portrayals of teenaged girls and boys, and of the complex relationships they have with each other, their friends, and their parents.
So I picked up 'Summer Sisters' with a mixture of trepidation (I didn't want to 'ruin' my love affair with Ms.
Blume and all my memories of her past books) and excitement (what if she had managed to pull it off, and had written a book for all her 'grownup' fans?).


Well, as you can see from my 2star rating, my opinion is lukewarm at best.
I think that truthfully, if it were NOT Ms.
Blume who had written this book, I'd score it a bit higher.
But the sad fact is that I had expectations and they were not met.


Unlike some other reviewers, I was not bothered by the oral sex conversations (I mean, this IS ho

Judy Blume

↠´ Summer Sisters Î Download by ↠´ Judy Blume Judy Blume spent her childhood in Elizabeth, New Jersey, making up stories inside her head. She has spent her adult years in many places doing the same thing, only now she writes her stories down on paper. Adults as well as children will recognize such Blume titles as: Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret; Blubber; Just as Long as We're Together; and the five book series about the irrepressible Fu